Inside Pesäpallo, Finland’s Answer to Baseball

Pesäpallo, a baseball-inspired sport with a few key differences, has been played in Finland since the 1920’s. It features a zig-zag base pattern and a completely bonkers way of pitching that must be seen to be believed.
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Comment (117)

  1. Americans should scout for young talented finnish baseball players. I mean if they can throw heavier ball at 85-90mph without "charging" (like pitchers do in american baseball)..they haven't even trained for that because in finnish baseball you don't have time to charge your throws.

  2. I saw a couple of pesäpallo games in Finland, and one ritual I thought was cool was that whenever a player crossed home plate they would pump one of their arms in the air.

  3. Maybe it’s just me but I think it’s a bit more entertaining to watch guys have to hit 100mph fastballs than have it lobbed in front of them like little league practice.

  4. I would put up any MLB player against of these “athletes” and see who comes out on top. The dude actually called baseball boring and then made that? Wow.

  5. Obviously hitting the ball is easier in Pesäpallo, but the pitcher doesn't just lob the ball for the batter.
    The pitcher can:
    – control the height of the pitch to make batting harder
    – position the pitch on the plate, so the ball doesn't just go straight up&down
    – give a curve to the serve
    – make an illegal serve on purpose, as the team inside often aim for a flying start from the base
    Pitcher is by far the most important player in pesäpallo. He/she has to know the best shots of key batter and also play against the coach/game manager of the oppising team to deny these flying starts from bases.

  6. Instead of taking baseball as is and becoming better at it (like the Japanese, Dominicans, Venezuelans, and Cubans) they decided to bastardize it into something that no one would enjoy. That was a missed opportunity Finland.

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