Growing up in a Romanian orphanage – BBC News

Izidor Ruckel was one of thousands of children found living in terrible conditions in Romanian orphanages after the collapse of the Communist government. Witness: The stories of our times told by the people who were there.

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Comment (870)

  1. No communist regime ever ‘cares for’ citizens, but contains them. To the communist people are nothing more than units of resource and consumption,

  2. There is a woman who believes she was abducted from Romania sometime from 1990-1997, then sold to her American family, what she remembers was that her mother, Ana Morari, was shot in the arm near a train station, then she was taken, she was about 5-7 years old, had blond hair. Her name was Irina Morari. Her father's name is Oleg Morari. She remembers living in the orphanage for about 4 years!

  3. God – who ties the babies to the crib !!!

    Evident cruelty and child abuse! What a murdering of these poor children! We are in the 21st century – what is happening in your country!

  4. I have lived in a Bucharest orphanage until I was 8 years old. When orphanage had been closed I moved to the streets of Bucharest until I was 14 years old in1998 when I made it illegally to Italy and I was taken in a social community where I grew up until 18 years of age. Now I still live in Italy and have family here. I was not one of the lucky ones that have been adopted but, all by myself, I made it!

  5. I grew up in a orphanage since i was a few months old till 11 years old. I had these foster parents that would take me in for a few months but than i had to go back to the terrible orphanage. I did that several times before i was finally adopted. Before i was these good old couple from england will take me there for a month to have a better days but i knew i had to go back to orphanage This was in targu mures romania

  6. A lot of the orphans who were abandoned as babies died very early because the staff never held them in their hands. Feeding them was not enough for their survival.

  7. i wish we could just kill sick/retarded babies at birth or even before abort them, i hate seeing money/time/emotion wasted on kids that are not meant to be in this world, but yet the bleeding hearts would rather they be alive and suffer then dead and not

  8. Communism is evil. Why would anyone believe that there's anything good about it. Socialism is one step away from Communism . Evil

  9. Romania is such an interesting country. My mother grew up in Romania back in the '70s and '80s. She wasn't an orphan, yet she had no father as her father was abusive and her mother and father divorced while she was young. She used to tell me stories when I was younger about how she grew up. She told me how her building never had warm water, and sometimes no water at all. She would talk about how when the food shipments came once every few months, she and her sister would trade what they would get as they rarely got fruits like bananas. My mom was a gymnast and a good one at that, yet she believes she was anorexic back then. The coaches were brutal, beat the kids, told them they were fat and made them stop eating in order to be skinnier, even if they had natural curves. At the age of 13, right before my mom quit, she said she weighed no more than 35 kilos. And my mom always says she was lucky. She grew up in hard conditions, yet she said she got the better end of the stick. She went to Finland in the early '90s and moved to the U.S in the early 2000s.

  10. This piece should mention the fact that Ceausescu banned all forms of contraception in the country in 1966 and even penalized people aged 20 to 40 with a "celibacy tax" if they had no children which would reduce their already meager Communist earnings by as much as 10%. It was called the "Natalist Policy" or "Decree 770."

  11. As someone with abusive parents. If you don’t want kids, have an extreme mental illness, struggle with life or have no empathy. Don’t become a parent. Don’t ruin another life. All children are entitled to a loving caring healthy childhood.

  12. why was the 20th century global welfare so appalling?, mother and baby homes, lunatic asylums, and Romanian orphanages, horrible, horrible, horrible

  13. 한국 일본간의 화합들이 될수있는 일들.부산과 제주도,후쿠오카 처럼,일본 한국간의 거리들이 가까운 지역들의 학교들에서,한국인들과 일본인들이 함께 교육들을 받는 학교들.이런 학교들은,일본에서는 한국학생들이 있는만큼씩들로,한국에서는 일본학생들이 있는 만큼씩들로,어떤 혜택들을,유학학생들과 학교들에 주는일들.해볼수있다고 하심.
    -한국 고아원들의 보모직원들과 복지원들 직원들중에,적은인원들로 일본인들도 쓰는 일들.해볼수있다고 하심.
    -미국인들과 유럽인들도,미국인디언들에게,해야할 필요들,있다고 하심.
    God(Our Lord),given this messages..

  14. It’s disgusting that this was allowed & still continues to happen along with the starvation, homelessness, abuse, trafficking, prostitution, slavery & major neglect of children all around the world. 😡

  15. I'm roumanian, living in Spain,l have never been through something like this,but l saw it on TV in the 90's,after Ceausescu died. Awful… What a nightmare. God bless the ones who adopted these children or part of them. I'm so sad. I'm glad the world got to see it. This is what comunism can do…

  16. 3:41 he says "only an institutionalized person would do". The parents of children with autism blame it on genetics or the jab. But Stefan and Dr. Faye know that it is parents who neglect their babies that are the real cause of autism.

  17. here we go again. These kids had a roof over their heads, food, clothes, education. Do you know how many kids are killed, used and abused in USA? do you know how many don't even have enough food?

  18. Rocking is also common in autistic children and adults. My daughter (nearly 23) rocks often when she's excited. My son also has autism but doesn't.

  19. I am really sorry you had to go through with that. When I get married and become a mom, I will make sure that I am there for my kids whether they are my own, adopted, or both. I have a heart for children and I could never imagine on abandoning any kind of child

  20. What is institutionalised child?

    I'm English and wondering if I was one. Born to the at risk register social services crawling over us. Which was great tbh. They didn't mind mum was a speed freak who smacked us around (if we deserved it) the social didnt care knowing basic needs are met. Ide have rather had new toys now and then than watch mum spoon feed herself pure whizz as she called it back then. 90s.

    When whizz a Dora kids show was a thing. My mum loved that show singing along the theme spoon feeding herself making her freinds grimace us kids just laughing at her. She always cooked and cleaned tho. But shy on toys. She was a never ending steam of affection tho a comedian to us. We were happy kids mostly.

    But still had to drop in to the care system now and then not for long 6mnth max. Mayb 6 families total some visited twice. Loved that too. But really missed mum. She would throw us boys at the care system now and then. She'd book into a nut house as she called it. Take a break from life lol. Then we'd go back as nothing happened. Or if new baby was coming we'd go. For afew weeks/months.

    Naturally I think anyway naturally I didn't do good at school. I was capable just didnt care. Nobody taught me how important education is. Explained nothing. I would laugh at my English teacher and tell her straight. I am English.

    Year 8 multiple suspensions for silliness usually cheeky to the teachers not listening. Disrupting the class and they had enough.

    I kinda expected not to make it to yr9 tho. My head of year in yr7 so tired of me being sent to her made me a promise. Lol. Promise if I make it to yr9 in that school she will let me drive her car around a race track. I believed her too. But I forgot at key moments either way I had 2wks left of yr8 im driving that car after summer. When a letter arrives saying im expelled no school in the county will accept me. Thanks to my trumped up school record. I was never ever violent to other students and I got bullied often by older lads. I would cuss out other students but they did too. None were expelled over it never allowed back into mainstream school. Not suspended banned for 2wks etc. I was stacking those slips since year2.

    My younger brother by 2yr my brother from my litter imo other siblings too large a gap they grew up way different. But this brother followed me and I followed him. Since he was fully expelled out not allowed back ever by yr4 after he trashed the classroom chairs thrown through windows all kinds.

    Their fault mayb. They knew hes ADHD must be medicated on ritalin or something either way mum was not allowed near it. LOL. Since its basically what she craves SPEED. So it stayed at school and the school was supposed to give it to him but often didnt. But that was him out. He went to naughty school fairly local lucky F.

    Me expelled in yr8 with a report making me sound like the jokers unwanted step child and acting out over it. Lol. No school in England would accept me. Only 2 and that was after a full year of no school whilst they try to find me a school. So all year 9 off. I ran Avon lol. Enjoyed that more than school.

    But then they found a school 6hrs taxi ride away. Underley Hall Boys School. Luvkily it was good to me just being locked away no freinds no family for a month until getting 2 days bsck home then back to school. I was lucky too I was a 36wk student. Others were 52wk students they had nowhere to go.

    But it was a crazy place to be and the locked away felt like prison. Then years later I learn just how bad that school really could have a been. The kids there in the 80s mayb 90s just before me are still going through the court cases all kinds of abuses. Often sexual its mad.

    None of that or even rumours like it was around there when I was. They must have reshuffled the place years before i started.

    Now 20yrs on I sometimes Google some of my school mates names into Google and often find their mug shot for latest crime. Even my best friend from there did a crime I never would expect him to do. But he did.

    Were we institutionalised children?

    Ofcourse many of us left school our parents lost their benefit allowance and we get evicted to the streets or if we lucky Grannys house.

  21. Orphanages in Romania are just a source of terror ,just a small percent barely under 2% of kids which were growing in those kind of places are going to be okay in their future , also the executive heads of those kind of places are not doing anything for the wellbeing , few of them built human trafficking gangs with protection from police , european councils should be aware of this , but they take advantage of this

  22. 애들이 앞뒤로 흔드는 정형행동? 그게 태어나서 안겨본적이 없어서 하는 행동이라는 걸 보고 너무 불쌍하다고 느꼈다ㅜㅜ

  23. I have an Hungarian friend who was raised in a Romanian orphanage in the late 50's and early 60's. I can't begin to imagine what this child experienced. Today he is a Beautiful devout Christian man. I love him Tremendously.

  24. My cousin adopted a boy from a Romanian Orphanage. Healthy boy. It took almost two years and a bit of money. He's a little off and doesn't quite fit in but is very well taken care of. His parents divorced when he was young. At 26, he still lives with his mom.

  25. A Story of Saints and Divine Blessings
    Sand castles

    Just as Harun was rich and opulent and Caliph of vast domains, Behlul was a saint, scornful of the riches of the world and focused on the eternal, timeless riches that accrue to men and women of goodness. Harun spent his time in the palace, surrounded by courtiers and sycophants. Behlul spent his time in the desert in seclusion. Oftentimes, he was observed building castles in the desert sand, only to demolish them after he had built them.

    One day, Harun was riding in the desert with his comrades when he saw his brother building castles in the sand. The emperor descended from his royal stallion and greeted his brother: “How are you, my good brother?”, asked the emperor. “Shukr Allah, Alhamdulillah (thanks be to God, praise be to God), I am well”, replied Behlul.

    The Caliph observed that Behlul had built a sand castle. Reaching out to engage his brother, Harun asked: “I would like to buy that sand castle. How much does it cost?” Behlul usually charged only one dinar (a gold coin) from merchants who were passing by. He would take the money and distribute it to the poor the following morning. But Harun was a mighty Caliph. He had untold riches. Behlul asked for a price worthy of a king.

    “One hundred dinars (gold coins)”, came the immediate reply. “And I will distribute the dinars to the poor tomorrow morning at the bazaar.” “One hundred dinars for a sand castle?” rejoined the Caliph. “That is too much for a mere sand castle”. “It is one hundred dinars. It is up to you either to buy it or not to buy it.” The Caliph was not interested. He said salaam to his brother, mounted his horse with its saddle of gold and rubies and departed.

    That night, as Harun slept in his royal chambers, he had a dream. He dreamed that he was taken up to heaven and was shown places of unspeakable grandeur and beauty. When Harun asked the accompanying angel to whom these palaces belonged, he was told these were the palaces built by his brother Behlul and purchased from him by passing merchants.

    Harun woke up immediately from the dream. He could sleep no longer and spent the night sauntering back and forth in his luscious gardens waiting for dawn. Even before the sun rose from the east, Harun mounted his horse and went out into the desert searching for his brother. At last he located him in a desolate spot, playing with sand as usual. Offering greeting of peace, the Caliph descended from his horse and in a very solicitous voice he said:

    “Brother, I will buy that castle you offered me yesterday for one hundred dinars: “The price has gone up. It is one million dinars today. And it must be paid in cash.”

    Harun was aghast. “One million dinars! Only yesterday, you said it was one hundred dinars.”

    “Yes, the angels took that castle to heaven. The demand is up and this is a new castle. I was told by the angels to distribute all of your gold among the poor of the land.”

    Harun felt remorse in his heart. He had missed a golden opportunity to buy for himself a castle in heaven. And now the asking price of one million dinars was so high. He left empty handed, walking slowly in the desert, holding the reins of his horse.

    The Shaikh who was narrating the story turned to his students and said: “O people! O my children! When Allah gives you an opportunity to do good, do not postpone it. The opportunity may never come back to you. A good deed is like Divine mercy. When you perform good deeds, you buy yourself a place close to Divine presence. You buy yourself a castle in heaven. Hal Jaza ul Ehsan il al Ehsan (What is the recompense of a good deed except the good deed itself?)”
    Please donate to Muslimcharity.Com

    https://muslimcharity.com/

  26. A Story of Saints and Divine Blessings
    Sand castles

    Just as Harun was rich and opulent and Caliph of vast domains, Behlul was a saint, scornful of the riches of the world and focused on the eternal, timeless riches that accrue to men and women of goodness. Harun spent his time in the palace, surrounded by courtiers and sycophants. Behlul spent his time in the desert in seclusion. Oftentimes, he was observed building castles in the desert sand, only to demolish them after he had built them.

    One day, Harun was riding in the desert with his comrades when he saw his brother building castles in the sand. The emperor descended from his royal stallion and greeted his brother: “How are you, my good brother?”, asked the emperor. “Shukr Allah, Alhamdulillah (thanks be to God, praise be to God), I am well”, replied Behlul.

    The Caliph observed that Behlul had built a sand castle. Reaching out to engage his brother, Harun asked: “I would like to buy that sand castle. How much does it cost?” Behlul usually charged only one dinar (a gold coin) from merchants who were passing by. He would take the money and distribute it to the poor the following morning. But Harun was a mighty Caliph. He had untold riches. Behlul asked for a price worthy of a king.

    “One hundred dinars (gold coins)”, came the immediate reply. “And I will distribute the dinars to the poor tomorrow morning at the bazaar.” “One hundred dinars for a sand castle?” rejoined the Caliph. “That is too much for a mere sand castle”. “It is one hundred dinars. It is up to you either to buy it or not to buy it.” The Caliph was not interested. He said salaam to his brother, mounted his horse with its saddle of gold and rubies and departed.

    That night, as Harun slept in his royal chambers, he had a dream. He dreamed that he was taken up to heaven and was shown places of unspeakable grandeur and beauty. When Harun asked the accompanying angel to whom these palaces belonged, he was told these were the palaces built by his brother Behlul and purchased from him by passing merchants.

    Harun woke up immediately from the dream. He could sleep no longer and spent the night sauntering back and forth in his luscious gardens waiting for dawn. Even before the sun rose from the east, Harun mounted his horse and went out into the desert searching for his brother. At last he located him in a desolate spot, playing with sand as usual. Offering greeting of peace, the Caliph descended from his horse and in a very solicitous voice he said:

    “Brother, I will buy that castle you offered me yesterday for one hundred dinars: “The price has gone up. It is one million dinars today. And it must be paid in cash.”

    Harun was aghast. “One million dinars! Only yesterday, you said it was one hundred dinars.”

    “Yes, the angels took that castle to heaven. The demand is up and this is a new castle. I was told by the angels to distribute all of your gold among the poor of the land.”

    Harun felt remorse in his heart. He had missed a golden opportunity to buy for himself a castle in heaven. And now the asking price of one million dinars was so high. He left empty handed, walking slowly in the desert, holding the reins of his horse.

    The Shaikh who was narrating the story turned to his students and said: “O people! O my children! When Allah gives you an opportunity to do good, do not postpone it. The opportunity may never come back to you. A good deed is like Divine mercy. When you perform good deeds, you buy yourself a place close to Divine presence. You buy yourself a castle in heaven. Hal Jaza ul Ehsan il al Ehsan (What is the recompense of a good deed except the good deed itself?)”
    Please donate to Muslimcharity.Com

    https://muslimcharity.com/

  27. Maybe a context to all this situation is needed.
    This dates back from an era when women in Romania were forced to have kids no matter what, just to have more populous to control and to build the socialist society. Didn't matter whether she was raped, the fetus had deformities and so forth, she had to give birth. Many of these abandoned orphans were from this kind of situations. Moreover, the "medical" personnel were educated in a society which gave no value to the individual.
    All this in a society that could barely take care of itself. The same situation was replicated in all the socialist/communist countries.

  28. My name is Franklin and looking for a Orphan girl as my soul partner to give her a better life and start a family which I always wanted to marry a Orphan because I am a Orphan to. Please help me to find a girl so I can start a family in America or UK. ⛪❤️🙏🙏🙏🙏

  29. If I have a chance to visit that orphanage places I will do my best to help sa mga BATA KASI it's really terrible Ang situation nila they needed a support and help na willing mo sacrifice ug ATIMAN sa mga BATA nga way ginikanan 😥😥😥😥😥😥😥😥

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