Amazing spider baffles scientists with huge web | The Hunt – BBC

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A Darwin’s bark spider sprays a 25 metre bridging line across a river. From this silken thread – which is the toughest natural fibre on the planet – she will suspend her web.

The contests between predators and prey are the most dramatic events in nature. The Hardest Challenge reveals the extraordinary range of techniques predators use to catch their prey – from a leopard using all its powers of stealth to stalk impala in broad daylight and wild dogs, whose tactic is to wear down their prey over long distances, to Nile crocodiles, the planet’s most patient predators, and killer whales who use teamwork and intelligence to take on humpback whales. But even with these finely tuned strategies, the outcome is far from certain. Surprisingly, most predators fail most of the time.

The Hunt | Series 1 Episode 1 | BBC One

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Comment (1,548)

  1. How we kill spiders how we kill spiders do you know how do you spiders Hyder. I do not like you spiders spider can you call me delete your placeHi guys I don’t know why did you spider shut up because you like do you know how to kill spider or should we do with you please please just have a go with you to please show me the video please can you show me the video I would like to do a deal think I’ll go back into my study please can you go to back to my starting please go back go back to the start of her not to talk to about this one one

  2. I have spiders like these in my backyard. They’ll build a web like this at golden hour and dismantle it in the morning and hide before the wasps come to feast on them.

  3. 거미가 거미줄을 재활용한다는거…
    예전에 감쪽같이 없어진 거미줄을 보고 가정만 했었었는데, 오늘 확실히 알았다.
    알면 알수록 신기한 거미 너란녀석~~^^
    장그러워도 곱게 봐줄께~

  4. Mr. Attenborough makes a statement which is so true: “How a spider no bigger than a thumbnail can produce so much silk so quickly has baffled scientists.”

    Amazing isn’t it, and yet there is before our eyes – – there’s no denying that this little animal does its work to perfection.

    And still, a vast majority of scientists don’t seem to be baffled at an equally fundamental “how“ question: “In regards to animal evolution, how did this amazing web-spinning capability develop from a previous animal in the supposed evolutionary chain – – a previous animal which, if evolution is true, could not and did not have a web-spinning device on it’s tiny body at all?”

    Evolution tells us that very slow incremental change accounts for everything that is. This obviously includes a web-spinning device which supposedly developed throughout millions of subsequent generations of this spider.

    If this is true, how useful and effective was this web-spinning component when it was, say, 1% developed on the body of this spider’s distant evolutionary ancestor?

    How was that unformed, non-developed “mass” destined to become the perfectly-functioning web-spinning device which we observe?

    With fully-functioning web spinning capabilities still millions or billions of years in the future on the evolutionary timeline, how did it’s infinitesimal beginnings even occur? Of what use were these tiny changes? How would tiny increments of change produce such an amazingly complex result?

    Logic and common sense ought never to be ignored. But it would appear that these many evolutionary scientists don’t admit to being baffled by these fundamental questions simply because they are not allowing logic and common sense to play out when they do allow these questions to pass through their minds.

    Evolution advocates would have us simply accept the theory as fact, rather than pondering the “hows” staring right at us.

  5. 0:02 they say those or actually thousands of threads, bonded together to make one web. think of how tiny a strand of spider web is. youd need a microscope to see the other threads. and its amazing they can keep doing this , multiple times, before they run out of webbing.

  6. I've spent my life watching and learning about spiders, and they never cease to amaze.
    –> toughest natural fibre & largest orb web: this species might be rivalled by the silk and orb webs of Nephila spiders.

  7. I've read that if a spider web were one half inch thick, it could snare a jumbo jet traveling at cruising speed. I also remember reading that it's being used as a component to make kevlar vests. That's some bad ass stuff.

  8. You must love Jehovah your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. You must love your neighbor as yourself. Jesus the anointed is Lord! Repent and be baptized and believe the Gospel.

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